Sydenham’s chorea

 
 

Overview

Characterized by rapid, jerky, irregular, and involuntary movements (especially of the face and limbs). In children, these symptoms often appear after strep throat or rheumatic fever, caused by a group A streptococcus infection. Group A streptococcus bacteria can react with a part of the brain called the basal ganglia to cause Sydenham’s chorea.

Common Symptoms

Uncoordinated movements, slurred speech stumbling, muscular weakness, tics, obsessions, compulsions, inattention, and anxiety.

Coexisting Diseases and Conditions

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and affective disorders, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and arthritis. 

Risk Factors and Prevalence

Sydenham’s chorea affects nearly 30% of individuals with rheumatic fever. Children from ages 5 to 18 are most affected, and it is three times more likely to occur in females.

Sources

  1. Article Sources and Footnotes
    1. Dai, A. I., Demiryürek, S., Keskin, M., & Demiryürek, A. T. (2015). Occurrence of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis among the patients with Sydenham’s chorea. The International journal of neuroscience, 125(8), 597–600. https://doi.org/10.3109/00207454.2014.956100

    2. NORD (National Organization for Rare Disorders). (2020, September 1). Sydenham chorea. NORD (National Organization for Rare Disorders). https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/sydenham-chorea/

    3. Punukollu, M., Mushet, N., Linney, M., Hennessy, C., & Morton, M. (2016). Neuropsychiatric manifestations of Sydenham’s chorea: a systematic review. Developmental medicine and child neurology, 58(1), 16–28. https://doi.org/10.1111/dmcn.12786

    4. Sehar, A., Nasir, S., & Seja, A. (2019). Rheumatic Chorea as the First Presenting Sign in a 13-year-old Female Child. Cureus, 11(8), e5447. https://doi.org/10.7759/cureus.5447

    5. Torreggiani, S., Torcoletti, M., Cuoco, F., Di Landro, G., Petaccia, A., & Corona, F. (2013). Chorea, a little-known manifestation in systemic lupus erythematosus: short literature review and four case reports. Pediatric rheumatology online journal, 11(1), 36. https://doi.org/10.1186/1546-0096-11-36

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