Researchers working in laboratory

Research We Fund

Current Grants

Characterizing the Autoantibody and Genetic Profiles of Patients with Multiple Autoimmune Conditions

Principal Investigators: Jocelyn Silvester, MD, Ph.D. and Denis Chang, MD, MS.

The research team at Boston Children’s Hospital will use blood samples to simultaneously test for multiple autoantibodies associated with many different autoimmune conditions using autoantigen microarray panels. Utilizing this technology, the team will investigate whether there are identifiable autoantibody signatures that can distinguish individuals who have only one autoimmune condition from those who have multiple.

The hope is to discover biomarkers that can be used to identify individuals who are at risk of polyautoimmunity prior to their development. The team will then use these findings to develop a standardized approach to screen and care for patients with multiple autoimmune conditions.

Jocelyn Silvester, MD, Ph.D

Denis Chang, MD, MS

Denis Chang, MD, MS

Previous Grants

Photo from left to right; Patrizio Caturegli, M.D., M.P.H., Director of The Autoimmune Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medicine; Sandra Boek Werness, Executive Director, GAI; Paulina Chalan, PhD, Walter and Jean Boek Autoimmune Research Fellow, Division of Immunology, Johns Hopkins Medicine

Exploring Effects of Cancer Immunotherapy Drugs on Autoimmune Manifestations

Principal Investigator: Dr. Paulina Chalan

Photo from left to right; Patrizio Caturegli, M.D., M.P.H., Director of The Autoimmune Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medicine; Sandra J. Boek, Executive Director, GAI; Paulina Chalan, PhD, Walter and Jean Boek Autoimmune Research Fellow, Division of Immunology, Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Postdoctoral research at Johns Hopkins Medicine is exploring the development of autoimmune hypophysitis (primarily affecting the pituitary gland) following cancer immunotherapy. This study is significant and unique, in that it will track the development of this autoimmune disease from inception, in mouse models, in order to better understand the evolution of the disease.

Photo: Linda Spatz, PhD, and colleagues in their lab

Antibodies to an Epstein Barr Virus Protein that Cross-React with dsDNA Have Pathogenic Potential

Principal Investigator: Dr. Linda Spatz

Photo: Linda Spatz, PhD, and colleagues in their lab, City University of New York (CUNY)

This scientific investigation of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients focuses on whether the Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) causes the production of human antibodies using molecular mimicry in SLE patients. This could suggest that EBV may be a cause of SLE. The long-term goal of the study is to design a treatment to block certain EBV antibodies that cause organ damage in SLE patients.

You can find the research article, published in Molecular Immunology, here!

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